Movement Mapping

by Dr. Reed Ferber, Ph.D. CAT(C)

“Running safety is an example of an important topic for women in particular,” says Marion Hart, the For Women Only training program instructor at Winnipeg’s Regent Avenue store. “We talk about ways to ‘run smart’, such as letting someone know when and where you’re running, carrying a phone and identification with you, and not running alone at night.” Continue reading “Movement Mapping”

Back to Square One

by Simon Ong

For many runners, a new year means setting new goals, whether it involves starting a new running program or aiming for a new distance. Ever since I laced up my running shoes at the Country Hills Running Room, I have continued to set goals and worked very hard to make them a reality. The road to success is never easy, and there are many setbacks along the way. Setbacks include taking a break from running due to health reasons, losing motivation or becoming injured. Continue reading “Back to Square One”

A Goal & a Half

by Meg Freer

I was nearing age 45, pregnant with my third child and, although not overweight, certainly not athletic or a runner in any way. For some reason, pregnancy hormones gave me the crazy desire to run a half marathon someday. I delivered my baby in the hospital and ended up having to stay a few days until my blood pressure went down. I had a beautiful view of Lake Ontario, and on the last Sunday of April I watched a steady stream of people run along the waterfront path all morning. At some point, I realized they were in a race. I didn’t know anything about racing, but I thought to myself that I wanted to do whatever they were doing. When I found out the race was the half marathon event at the annual Limestone Race Weekend, I remembered my prenatal desire to run my own half, and this became my goal. Continue reading “A Goal & a Half”

Active Vacation Tips

by Don Zabloski

Family vacations lead to new adventures and traditions that will enhance your family conversations and memories for years to come.

A vacation can also be a time to enhance everyone’s physical literacy skills by planning active adventures or trying new activities and sports. For example, you can walk or hike into a rainforest; swim, snorkel, or scuba dive with marine life; ride a zipline above the treetops; or ski (downhill or cross-country) over new terrain. The experience may help your family members realize how capable they are of handling new challenges. Continue reading “Active Vacation Tips”

What Your Running Shoes are Trying to Tell You

by John Stanton

If your running shoes could talk, think of the stories they’d tell. While you’re probably grateful that they can’t share the play-by-play of the time you stepped in goose droppings, your well-worn shoes do have a lot to say about what kind of runner you are. Before you purchase a new pair, give your old shoes a proper once-over to learn more about your running style.

Remove your pair of “old faithfuls” and follow these steps. Continue reading “What Your Running Shoes are Trying to Tell You”

Race Giving

Race: Santa Shuffle 5K Fun Run and 1K Elf Walk
Amount : $131,054.72
Learn more at santashuffle.ca

For the past 27 years, the Salvation Army and Running Room have partnered to present the annual Santa Shuffle 5K Fun Run and 1K Elf Walk. The Santa Shuffle has grown from a single event in Edmonton to a large-scale initiative with over 16,000 participants in 41 locations across Canada. Continue reading “Race Giving”

Milking It

by Jen Rawson, RD

Navigating milk choices has become infinitely more complicated over the past decade. It used to be a decision of what fat percentage milk to buy: skim, 1% or 2%. Now, there are many questions, such as: should I be buying cow’s milk at all? Should I consider alternatives such as almond, cashew, hemp or coconut milk? Are all the options healthy? Continue reading “Milking It”

Plantar Fasciitis

by Dr. Richard Beauchamp, M.D., FRCSC

The “plantar” surface refers to the sole of the foot, while fascia is tough, fibrous tissue with no active muscle. The plantar fascia serves as a connecting structure from the back of the foot (at the heel bone) to the front (at the toes). It supports the arch and assists in the biomechanics of walking and running. Although the suffix “itis” suggests inflammation, the plantar fascia has a limited blood supply so inflammatory changes are minimal. A more appropriate name for this ailment would actually be plantar tendonopathy. Continue reading “Plantar Fasciitis”