Ankle Sprains

with Dr. Richard Beauchamp M.D., FRCSC

An ankle sprain refers to an acute or sudden injury that results in tearing of any of the ligaments of the ankle. Ligaments are strong tissues that attach to the adjacent bones of a joint, providing stability and limiting excessive movement. Sprains are usually graded according to the severity of the injury, as follows:

Classification: Grade 1
This refers to a mild stretch of some of the ligament fibres only. The individual is able to initially walk on the ankle without much discomfort. There may be some swelling, but recovery is usually complete in a few days. Continue reading “Ankle Sprains”

Fast, Healthy, and Strong

by Pam Nyrose

The goal for my 55th birthday (in September 2018) was to run a full marathon. In November 2017, I suffered a concussion that took me out of training for four months. The recovery was tedious and painfully slow. I was so excited in March when I got the go-ahead to run for five minutes. By April, I had worked up to running for 30 minutes, which I did at a 10K event in Jasper. After a consultation with my healthcare professionals in June, I was encouraged to save my dream of a marathon for another year. In July, I injured my leg which took me out for another month. I was so disappointed and discouraged. Would I ever get my strength and endurance back? Now even a half marathon was looking doubtful. Continue reading “Fast, Healthy, and Strong”

Mindful Eating

by Lisa Podlecki, RD

As we enter a new year, our thoughts often turn to setting new goals. For some athletes, this can mean losing weight or building muscle mass. As with any goal, however, long-term success starts with a solid foundation. For some, this may mean creating a healthy relationship with your body, or with food, or even being more conscious of how you are fuelling your body. Mindfulness is the concept of being aware of one’s thoughts and feelings in the moment—and is not just for your typical yogi. In fact, athletes are particularly good at being in tune with their bodies! Let’s look at how mindfulness relates to eating.

What is mindful eating?
Mindful eating is about being in the present moment and can incorporate all components of eating as well as our interactions with food. For example, you can be mindful of the enjoyment you get from preparing a meal. You can notice the taste, look and texture of what you are eating. You can observe, honestly and without judgement, how food makes you feel. You can be more aware of your hunger and fullness cues. Continue reading “Mindful Eating”

Dealing With Darkness

by John Stanton

In the winter, daylight is a precious commodity. Many of us experience the daily challenge of leaving the house when it’s dark and returning after the sun has already set. However, with proper planning and a positive attitude, you can maintain your fitness and still enjoy your training. Here are some suggestions to help you dodge the darkness.

Get out there during the day.
Take advantage of the daylight as much as possible. If your schedule is flexible, prioritize your run in the mid-morning or early afternoon. If you have a more traditional work day, try to run or walk during your lunch hour at least once a week. Exposure to natural light helps regulate your inner body clock and provides a bonus helping of vitamin D. Continue reading “Dealing With Darkness”

This is Why I Run

by Rainer Wosnitza

I turned 40 in 2001. Like others who reach a milestone age, I spent time reflecting on aspects of my life—my health, in particular. I was in okay shape, and naively assumed the good health generally accompanying youth would continue. That attitude was wrong. The wheels on my cart were starting to wobble, and as much as I tried to ignore it, I knew my body was sending me subtle wake-up calls. Continue reading “This is Why I Run”

Customizing Your Training Plan

by John Stanton

How you train will influence your results, whether you are trying to maximize your potential or simply improve your overall fitness. Most programs emphasize structure, consistency and slow progression toward a goal. This requires a delicate balance of listening to your body and striving for continual improvement. Here are four considerations as you build your personalized training program. Continue reading “Customizing Your Training Plan”

In winter, how should runners adapt their food choices to optimize performance?

by Tara Postnikoff

At this time of year, optimizing running performance often has a lot to do with being consistent. Consistency in both training and eating habits will help runners stay healthy, avoid extended time off due to illness and reduce the risk of injury. These are all important ways to stay on track for your spring race goals.

To reduce the risk of illness and injury, we need to supply the body with foods that provide the nutrients needed for success. One way to do that is by focusing on a plant-based diet. Plant-based eating doesn’t have to exclude meat; it means to emphasize the consumption of foods coming directly from plants, including vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, legumes, and even grasses and grains. Continue reading “In winter, how should runners adapt their food choices to optimize performance?”

Walking in a Winter Wonderland

by John Stanton

There’s “snow” doubt about it—running and walking are healthy activities that can be enjoyed year-round. If you’re a runner who is recovering from injury or seeking an alternative to running during the winter months, consider walking. Walking is a gentle and safe option for many athletes, since the impact force is little more than the body weight you carry when standing upright. Here are some of the benefits.
Continue reading “Walking in a Winter Wonderland”