Out of the Ordinary

by Melissa Ellis

I ran until I found a balloon.

It was floating by and the string dangled lazily across the sky. I thought it might get tangled on the trees close to the road, but it floated just above the tree line and skimmed across them to continue on its way. I smiled and turned around.

This will be my year, I thought. For one year, my runs would be marked by the finding of the ordinary and the special of the things I saw on my run. Continue reading “Out of the Ordinary”

Atacama Crossing

by Troy Schaab

I blame YouTube. That’s where I stumbled upon a video about a 7-day, 250-kilometre race in Chile’s Atacama Desert. I was in.

Upon arriving at the village of San Pedro de Atacama, I met the other 81 runners from around the world who were also jacked up about this adventure. I remember feeling way out of my league. Most of the runners had done previous multi-stage races and seemed to have all the latest in cool gadgets and running gear. The majority of the supplies in my backpack still had the price tags on them. Continue reading “Atacama Crossing”

There Are No Red Lights in Marathons

by Kalia Douglas-Micallef

“But I’m tired,” I moaned and huffed as my mother and I arrived at a crosswalk with the red hand flashing.

“There are no red lights in marathons,” my mother would say.

“Keep jogging on the spot!”

My mother, Gabriella, transformed her life through running. At times, it seemed that running was the new love of her life in place of me, her daughter. I would wait in the early mornings for what seemed like forever for my mom to come back from her long runs. I would be the last one to be picked up at birthday parties due to her running.

She travelled far and wide, just for running. Continue reading “There Are No Red Lights in Marathons”

Say Hello to the Run-elles

by Darcia Kmet

In May 1999, eight women set foot—or rather, running shoe—into the Bank Street Running Room in Ottawa, for the first day of the 10-week 10K training program. The goal? To run and complete the Rattle Me Bones race. Each of the women had an individual reason for joining this clinic: lose weight, run faster, set a personal best time, meet new people, and so on.

The clinic leaders welcomed runners, both new and veteran, and outlined how the evening and next 10 weeks would unfold. Every week, participants would be greeted by then-store manager Phil Marsh as they arrived. Runners gathered around clothing racks, perused the latest styles and eventually huddled with those of equal running pace while they waited in anticipation for the session to start. The weekly routine entailed a guest speaker and a breakdown of the evening’s workout—followed by packs of runners taking over the Rideau Canal path for their scheduled group run. Continue reading “Say Hello to the Run-elles”

GTA Women Runs Oakville Half Marathon Blindfolded

My name is Stephanie Thompson and I run to raise awareness for mental health.

My friend Sam Chefero and I are from Aurora, ON. Together we recently conquered the Oakville Half Marathon with an added challenge: I was running blindfolded tethered to my running guide, Sam. I was running in the complete dark for the entire 21K race. For me, this blindfolded experience symbolized what it can feel like struggling with mental health; alone, consumed by your thoughts and surrounded by darkness. Continue reading “GTA Women Runs Oakville Half Marathon Blindfolded”

My Natural Medication

by Marjan Ashrafi

My depression and anxiety started back in 2004, when I lost my only sibling. My young and beautiful sister died in an accident. After her death, I began to notice myself worrying and overthinking everything. Crying became a daily part of living. I didn’t have any 
motivation for anything. I felt my medication wasn’t helping enough. I hated myself and my life.

Continue reading “My Natural Medication”

The Sixth Star

The Tokyo Marathon

 Below, another Canadian runner shares her story of completing the Tokyo Marathon, the sixth event in the Abbott World Marathon Majors series (the other five are Boston, London, Berlin, Chicago and New York). Now in its 12thyear, the series attracts thousands of runners from 190 countries. Amateurs can vie to complete all the races in the coveted Six Star Finisher program, which was launched in 2014. Continue reading “The Sixth Star”

A Change for the Better

by Shane Dixon

If anyone tells you that running will change your life, you should listen, because it’s true. I’m living proof.

Throughout most of my life, the bulk of my time was spent going to the gym, lifting weights, and, like most younger men, trying to become bigger and more muscular. I often neglected the importance of cardio activities, and instead focused mostly on weight training. During this period of my life, I also enjoyed Toronto’s night life, and spent many nights going out to bars and binge-drinking with friends. Partying served as the perfect outlet for me as I was unhappy with parts of my life, miserable with my sales job, and chose to drown my sorrows with alcohol. Continue reading “A Change for the Better”