What You Need to Know About Runner’s Knee

by Dr. Richard Beauchamp M.D., FRCSC

Have you experienced pain around the front of your knee(s) during or after a run? If so, you may have had a case of runner’s knee. Runner’s knee is actually a vague term used to describe the above symptom—pain in the knee. However, it is not necessarily a precursor of arthritis; in fact, it has been said that there is no correlation to hip and knee arthritis in active marathoners.1

Runner’s knee is a common condition, but the actual causes and effective treatments are not easily explained. Runner’s knee is a grab bag of other diagnoses and conditions often aggravated by the pounding of the legs on the ground during your sport. Your legs have to generate force in order to run, as well as absorb force in order to protect your bones and muscles from injuries. Runner’s knee can also occur in walkers, although not as frequently. Continue reading “What You Need to Know About Runner’s Knee”

Can I Return to Running After My Hip Replacement?

by Dr. Richard Beauchamp, M.D., FRCSC

Joint replacement surgery, particularly of the hip and knee, has become one of the most frequently performed operations around the world. According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, over 300,000 total hip replacements (THR) are completed in the United States every year, and the number of knee replacements is even higher. Continue reading “Can I Return to Running After My Hip Replacement?”

Pain in the Butt

by Dr. Richard Beauchamp, M.D., FRCSC

Recently, we invited readers to send in topic suggestions for this column, and here is one of the replies we received:

“May I suggest an article about butt pain? In my case, it is probably a glute issue, which may or may not have been caused by years of running without adequate stretching. It is certainly inhibiting my running now. Is there anything I can do?” Continue reading “Pain in the Butt”

Fractured Fibula

by Dr. Richard Beauchamp, M.D., FRCSC

The fibula is the bone on the outside of the leg and is the smaller of the two bones of the lower leg (the other is the tibia or shin bone). The tibia handles most of the weight bearing responsibilities while the fibula contributes to the stability of the knee and ankle joints. The fibula keeps the ankle joint in line and helps, along with the ligaments, to prevent ankle sprains. Continue reading “Fractured Fibula”

Plantar Fasciitis

by Dr. Richard Beauchamp, M.D., FRCSC

The “plantar” surface refers to the sole of the foot, while fascia is tough, fibrous tissue with no active muscle. The plantar fascia serves as a connecting structure from the back of the foot (at the heel bone) to the front (at the toes). It supports the arch and assists in the biomechanics of walking and running. Although the suffix “itis” suggests inflammation, the plantar fascia has a limited blood supply so inflammatory changes are minimal. A more appropriate name for this ailment would actually be plantar tendonopathy. Continue reading “Plantar Fasciitis”